Feminist Media

Taking Back the Media

5 notes

Feminist filmmaker seeking support! I would love to share my project with you that tackles the misrepresentation of periods in the media and is my personal contribution to the movement that supports gender equality and diversity in the entertainment industry! Above is my campaign video and here is a link to the campaign: igg.me/at/periodfilm

Thank you so much :)

- Kristine Gerolaga @kristeen_gee @aperiodfilm

31 notes

lipsredasroses:

I got my mom this iphone5 case for xmas. I did not realize that the iphone 5/s case wont fit the iphone 5C. Needless to say, we have no use for it since neither of us have a phone that can use this case. So I am selling it.I took the case out of the package to show you it still has everything it came with.

I’m selling it for $25 with shipping if you live in the US. If you live outside of the US it will be $30 with shipping.

The case is $40 if you want to buy it at the Disney parks or Disney Stores website.

Here is my email for dizpins, lisaoar@yahoo.com and here is my feedback on disneypinsforum. I usually trade and have sold pins but the feedback still applies.

47,186 notes

Anonymous asked: Calm down, it isn't that big of a deal that people don't know women don't pee out of their vag, sheesh.

afadingoctober:

bam-monsterhospital:

afadingoctober:

Look, it’s our friendly male-privileged anon come to tell me I’m being all womanly hysterical.

I’m assuming you’re a guy. If you’re a girl, and this doesn’t piss you off, I’m a little concerned, honestly.

The fact is that it is a big deal, and you just earned yourself a free lecture on why so siddown and shaddup.

Cracked ran a rather diverting article today on

"6 Insane Sex Myths People Used to Teach as Facts"

including things like how westerners apparently thought that Chinese women who immigrated had sideways vaginas and that doctors attributed any number of problems to the fact that they believed women’s uteri could detach themselves when the woman was not pregnant and scamper around the woman’s innards like some sort of wayward jellyfish blob.
Hilarious, right? Can’t believe people used to think that! Oh, how naive they all were!
Which brings us to women-pee-out-of-their-vagina.
People back then kind of have an excuse for stupid notions, because a lot of the time there wasn’t the technology or research or scientific community to call them out on it in order to spread information that was actually factual.
We do not have that excuse today.
Yes, I heard that, greyface in sunglasses in the second row.
"well we don’t teach ridiculous stuff like that!"
Spoiler Alert: We totally do.
Stuff like the complete erasure of parts of female anatomy, publicly taught and widespread misinformation about others and the fact that I learned more about my own body with 15 minutes on Wikipedia than I did in two mandatory Health classes and a Medical Anatomy class.
Send your arguments at me, believe me, they don’t hold water.
"The clitoris doesn’t have anything to do with reproduction!"
Sex Ed covers more than just reproduction. Every time they sent me home with a little paper for your parent/guardian to sign, they said they would be talking about anatomy as well as reproduction.
"Well, female anatomy is a lot more complicated…"
Doesn’t that mean they should spend more time covering it rather than skipping over the parts they deem ‘unnecessary’? Even in my Medical Anatomy class when we had the diagrams to label, despite there being a clitoris in the diagram, there wasn’t a lil line to write down what it was.
"Maybe they didn’t think it was appropriate to talk about for high school."
Female pleasure.
So lewd.
How dare they.
Get the pitchforks and burn the witch.
"They don’t talk about male pleasure either!"
Bitch, please.
I heard aaaaalll about what happens when a dude is aroused and orgasms with the erections and ejaculations and all that nonsense.
Girl orgasms are apparently not a thing. And, depending on the class, neither was female arousal.
(Which I find decidedly disturbing, as a side note.)
"Female orgasms aren’t a part of reproduction either."
Maybe not.
BUT IT IS A SIMPLE PHYSICAL REACTION THAT SHOULD BE TAUGHT IF ONLY FOR SCIENTIFIC AND MEDICAL ACCURACY.
"Fine. The clitoris is controversial. That hardly covers the entire spectrum of female sexuality having misinformation and crap."
Apparently you didn’t read the part up above about how I did not learn what happens when a woman is aroused or orgasms in three years of classes that are supposed to teach me about this thing.
"If it took you 15 minutes on Wikipedia to figure stuff out, why are you so mad? That’s hardly a waste of time."
Because I deserve to know about my own body, and when schools teach Sex Ed in any form, they are taking on the responsibility of teaching me that.
And yet, I learned absolutely nothing useful.
That’s a problem.
"Okay, okay. They don’t talk about female sexual reactions, and that’s kinda sexist."
You know what else is kinda sexist? Telling men that sex is great and women that it’s going to hurt and suck and also you’ll get pregnant and die.
What am I talking about, you say?
The hymen. You know, the thing that covers a woman’s vaginal opening and breaks and there’s blood and that’s how you can tell if your girlfriend is lying about whether or not you’re her first.
Well guess what, buddy-boy, you dumped that girl for no reason because that’s not actually what a hymen is and you’re also a jerk.
The hymen is a flexible membrane that partially covers the vaginal opening (usually in a sort of crescent shape when they are but a wee lass) and did you notice the word up there? ‘Flexible’? Do you know what that means? It means that if a woman is sufficiently aroused, it prolly ain’t gonna break. (wow do you think this myth has anything to do with the lack of knowledge we’re taught about female arousal???)
I mean dude you can shove a baby outta that thing and it returns to its original shape, you can’t tell if a woman is a virgin or not by the state of her hymen anyways. They can tear during exercise n stuff as well but there is literally not much of a reason why sex should be painful for girls and why you call it “popping the cherry”
OH WAIT MAYBE IT’S BECAUSE DUDES LIKE TO THINK THAT THEIR DICK HAS MAGICAL POWERS THAT FOREVER CHANGES A WOMAN’S LIFE AND SHE’S NEVER BE THE SAME AFTER YOU WRECKED THAT TIGHT LIL HOLE.
Well, fun fact, if she’s tight that means you kind of suck balls at the whole sex thing.
This isn’t just a matter of some people making a mistake about how women urinate. This is part of a long history of the suppression of female sexuality to the point that when you get a damn diagram of the vulva, apparently they don’t mark where the urethra is because man we don’t want to spend too much time talking about ladyparts frick who knows what’s hiding down there…

In my own 7th grade health class, and even in goddam 11th and 12th grade highschool biology, they left out female pleasure to such an extent as a thing, that I thought orgasm and penile ejaculation were synonymous.  That orgasm was only a penis-owning thing; that orgasm was when those with penises spewed sperm, not that it was a pleasurable climax, not that it was its own thing, not that people with vaginas could experience them.

You want to know how we were told about the clitoris? Through less than two sentences in seventh grade health class.  “This is the clitoris: it’s like a button and and can get harder”.  That’s it.  That’s it.

Can we talk about how dangerous this is, actually?

Yes. I said dangerous. Not because I’m a girl and I would like sex to be enjoyable thank you, but because we’re teaching women that a men have a right to have sex be enjoyable where we do not.

We’re teaching women that if she is uncomfortable or in pain, that is normal and she has no right to complain.

We’re teaching women to do something because it makes a man happy, regardless of how she feels.

We’re teaching women to be the submissive, receptive partner rather than an active participant.

I didn’t learn about a woman’s arousal or a woman’s orgasm simply because apparently that isn’t important.

It doesn’t matter if a woman is enjoying it.

It doesn’t matter if she likes what you’re doing.

We teach these things in a public setting, and we wonder why youth are legitimately confused about what constitutes rape, and why it is a bad thing that has a profoundly negative and possibly permanent effect on the victim.

348,739 notes

wizzard890:

xshruglife:



“Everything in the world is about sex except sex. Sex is about power.”  Oscar Wilde


Forever reblog

This gif’s widespread use as shorthand for the concept of ~weaponized femininity~ has always bothered me, and I’ve never understood why it’s become so popular. I mean, sure, at first brush, it seems obvious: here is a studiedly beautiful woman who, with the simple gesture of placing a cigarette between her lips, has dozens of men wrapped around her finger, vying for her favor. But just take a minute here and look at her face. She’s not reveling in this, you get the feeling that she didn’t even expect it, this woman is upset and overwhelmed by the amount of male attention she’s getting.
Because this is a pivotal moment in a movie about a woman who is forced into prostitution.
Giuseppe Tornatore’s Malena came out in 2000, and starred Monica Bellucci as the titular Malena, a young wife whose husband is off fighting for the Axis Powers in WWII. Beautiful and shy, Malena tries to keep to herself, but finds it increasingly difficult as word of her husband’s absence attracts not only the attention of all the men in town, but the bitter jealousy of their wives and lovers. She does nothing to encourage any of her suitors, and instead spends her days caring for her aging father. But this uneasy peace in her life is shattered when she receives word of her husband’s death, and she’s left to fend for herself in a town where half the people only care for her body, and the other half hate her for it.
In the rest of the film we see the following: Malena’s relationship with her father destroyed as a result of sexual slander, Malena taken to court by a jealous neighbor who swears the young woman was sleeping with her husband, Malena’s rape by her lawyer as “payment” for her legal fees, Malena’s entry into the world of prostitution, and Melena’s public beating, stripping, and humiliation at the hands of the town’s women when the Americans arrive at the end of the war. Her husband appears in the third act, somehow alive, and he reclaims his wife, restoring her to respectability, and the townspeople begin to accept her once more, now that she is on the arm of her husband, and has, as some of the women whisper, ‘put on a little weight”. 
But in spite of all of that, the film isn’t Malena’s story. Instead, we see her life through the eyes of our narrator, a young boy who by turns worships her and is disgusted by her “fall”. This is his coming of age, his discovery of himself through Malena’s trauma and the specter of female sexual jealousy.
In short, this is not a woman’s movie. Malena’s beauty is a cage, something that draws awful, selfish responses from the men around her, responses that she is forced to endure as a result of her situation. And what’s worse, her looks isolate her from women, none of whom can see past her smoky eyes and hourglass figure to the heartbroken widow who needs a friend.
So you know. Use gifs if you like, weaponize that femininity in the most numbskulled, reductively simple way possible, because lipstick is ~how you control men~ and Sex Is About Power, like Oscar Wilde said. Just remember that in this film, and so tragically often in real life, that power doesn’t rest in women’s hands. 

 Reblogged for commentary.

wizzard890:

xshruglife:


“Everything in the world is about sex except sex. Sex is about power.”  Oscar Wilde

Forever reblog

This gif’s widespread use as shorthand for the concept of ~weaponized femininity~ has always bothered me, and I’ve never understood why it’s become so popular. I mean, sure, at first brush, it seems obvious: here is a studiedly beautiful woman who, with the simple gesture of placing a cigarette between her lips, has dozens of men wrapped around her finger, vying for her favor. But just take a minute here and look at her face. She’s not reveling in this, you get the feeling that she didn’t even expect it, this woman is upset and overwhelmed by the amount of male attention she’s getting.

Because this is a pivotal moment in a movie about a woman who is forced into prostitution.

Giuseppe Tornatore’s Malena came out in 2000, and starred Monica Bellucci as the titular Malena, a young wife whose husband is off fighting for the Axis Powers in WWII. Beautiful and shy, Malena tries to keep to herself, but finds it increasingly difficult as word of her husband’s absence attracts not only the attention of all the men in town, but the bitter jealousy of their wives and lovers. She does nothing to encourage any of her suitors, and instead spends her days caring for her aging father. But this uneasy peace in her life is shattered when she receives word of her husband’s death, and she’s left to fend for herself in a town where half the people only care for her body, and the other half hate her for it.

In the rest of the film we see the following: Malena’s relationship with her father destroyed as a result of sexual slander, Malena taken to court by a jealous neighbor who swears the young woman was sleeping with her husband, Malena’s rape by her lawyer as “payment” for her legal fees, Malena’s entry into the world of prostitution, and Melena’s public beating, stripping, and humiliation at the hands of the town’s women when the Americans arrive at the end of the war. Her husband appears in the third act, somehow alive, and he reclaims his wife, restoring her to respectability, and the townspeople begin to accept her once more, now that she is on the arm of her husband, and has, as some of the women whisper, ‘put on a little weight”. 

But in spite of all of that, the film isn’t Malena’s story. Instead, we see her life through the eyes of our narrator, a young boy who by turns worships her and is disgusted by her “fall”. This is his coming of age, his discovery of himself through Malena’s trauma and the specter of female sexual jealousy.

In short, this is not a woman’s movie. Malena’s beauty is a cage, something that draws awful, selfish responses from the men around her, responses that she is forced to endure as a result of her situation. And what’s worse, her looks isolate her from women, none of whom can see past her smoky eyes and hourglass figure to the heartbroken widow who needs a friend.

So you know. Use gifs if you like, weaponize that femininity in the most numbskulled, reductively simple way possible, because lipstick is ~how you control men~ and Sex Is About Power, like Oscar Wilde said. Just remember that in this film, and so tragically often in real life, that power doesn’t rest in women’s hands. 

Reblogged for commentary.

(Source: defpro, via dragonsbones)

521 notes

Consider how difficult it has been to reverse the situation [objectifying men]. Bob Gruccione and the Penthouse empire tried to sell beefcake to women the way he sold cheesecake to men. He produced a magazine called Viva in 1972. It featured sexually explicit accounts of women’s sexual adventures punctuated with male nudes. The problems was where to display it. Put it beside Playboy and Penthouse, and he doesn’t get his targetted audience. Put it beside Chatelaine and Good Housekeeping, and he causes apoplexy among the readers of those magazines. But eventually he did find his audience. Women were delighted. They used to have to settle for Cosmopolitan telling him how to land Mr. Right. Now they found out what happened once he was in hand, and they liked it. But they started to complain. They said,”These guys look gay.” The producers of Penthouse did everything they could to make sure that this would not happen.

They knew that if you spread a woman’s legs and put her looking at a camera, she’ll look sexy. But you can’t do it with men. So they tried everything. They had him in forest settings. They had him looking out into the distance to make him look like he had control over the whole environment. They had him on horses so that he could look like the Malboro man. And they still “looked gay” (quotations added). This is not to cast aspersions on my gay brothers, but rather to say that when women looked at these pictures, they did not see what they considered masculine by conventional standards. My point is that if you reduce a woman to tits and ass, she’ll look like a woman, but reduce a man, and he will not look masculine according to our standards.

Cole G, Susan. Sexual Values: Opposing Viewpoints. “Pornography Is Harmful.” Greenhaven Press, Inc. 1989. (pg. 132-133)

(Source: gynocraticgrrl, via petitesurrealiste)

125 notes

In the 1970s and 1980s some major campaigns were directed at stripping away from men the privilege of having male-only spaces in which to socialize and do business where women were not allowed. These campaigns included demanding and achieving women’s entry to public houses, to sporting clubs and other places of entertainment on an equal basis with men. The boom in strip clubs can be seen as a counterattack, in which men have reasserted their right to network for and through male dominance without the irritating presence of women, unless those women are naked and servicing their pleasures.

Frank found that an important reason for men to visit the clubs was that they provided a compensation for the decline in power that they experienced as their wives, partners, and women workmates shed their subordination, began to compete with them, and demanded equality. The strip clubs provided an antidote to the erosion of male dominance by institutionalizing the traditional hierarchy of gender relations. The men found everyday relationships with women ‘a source of pressure and expectations’ and described relations between women and men in general as being ‘strained,’ as ‘confused,’ or ‘tense.’ One buyer referred to the ‘war between the sexes.’ They sought respite from the problems of having to treat women as equals in the workplace too. One of Frank’s respondents, Philip, said that he was able to ‘let frustration out’, particularly about ‘this sexual harassment stuff going around these days, men need somewhere to go where they can say and act like they want.’

Jeffreys, Sheila. “The Industrial Vagina: The Political Economy of the Global Sex Trade.” Routledge, 2009. (p. 103 - 104)

(Source: gynocraticgrrl, via petitesurrealiste)

16 notes

In “Half the Sky Movement: The Game,” the game-player is forced to choose between ‘lying’ or ‘telling the truth’ to Radhika’s husband, who is represented as a heathen barrier to women’s empowerment. It’s a moment that exemplifies how the Half the Sky game erases the heterogeneous voices and complex struggles of “Third World” women, instead representing them singularly as victims in need of the Western game-player’s rescue. It’s a moment that typifies what Gayatri Spivak calls the colonial logic of “white men saving brown women from brown men.”
"Escape from the White-Savior Industrial Complex: The Game" is a spoof that attempts to complicate and stimulate dialogue about Half the Sky’s representations. 

In “Half the Sky Movement: The Game,” the game-player is forced to choose between ‘lying’ or ‘telling the truth’ to Radhika’s husband, who is represented as a heathen barrier to women’s empowerment. It’s a moment that exemplifies how the Half the Sky game erases the heterogeneous voices and complex struggles of “Third World” women, instead representing them singularly as victims in need of the Western game-player’s rescue. It’s a moment that typifies what Gayatri Spivak calls the colonial logic of “white men saving brown women from brown men.”

"Escape from the White-Savior Industrial Complex: The Game" is a spoof that attempts to complicate and stimulate dialogue about Half the Sky’s representations. 

474 notes

lipsredasroses:

effyeaharthistory:

Judith mit dem Haupt des Holofernes (Judith with the Head of Holofernes), Lucas Cranach the Elder, c. 1530, oil on canvas, 75 x 56 cm, Jagdschloss Grunewald, Berlin
Yeah, I just decapitated the general of the invading army clothed in my finest dress, and not a drop of blood on it. Don’t you mess with me, cus I’m a mutherfuckin bad-ass!

This painting is my new icon. I love it so much. I love Judith, she is my favorite character in the Apocrypha. Such a kick ass woman. 

lipsredasroses:

effyeaharthistory:

Judith mit dem Haupt des Holofernes (Judith with the Head of Holofernes), Lucas Cranach the Elder, c. 1530, oil on canvas, 75 x 56 cm, Jagdschloss Grunewald, Berlin

Yeah, I just decapitated the general of the invading army clothed in my finest dress, and not a drop of blood on it. Don’t you mess with me, cus I’m a mutherfuckin bad-ass!

This painting is my new icon. I love it so much. I love Judith, she is my favorite character in the Apocrypha. Such a kick ass woman. 

49 notes

lipsredasroses:

Disney marketing 101!

Lets just look at how Disney markets their merchandise. This post will not touch on the movies, since that is a post in and of itself. Lets start with how you can search for merchandise such as toys, clothes, etc. You can search for thing by age. You can search for thing by character. You know what else you can search for things by? Gender. You can search for merchandise based on whether or not you are a girl, boy, woman, or man. Those are your 4 gender options.

Now lets take a look at how girls and boys toys are being marketed. For the girls you see Cinderella, Minnie, Rapunzel, and Merida. All the girls are in rather passive poses. Cinderella has her arms folded and her hands near her head. Rapunzel is twirling her hair. Merida is leaning and Minnie is waving. Sulley is the only boy in a rather passive pose. He is just waving. Iron man looks ready to fight. Jake is holding his sword like he is ready to fight. The plane looks like it is ready to take off. The girls are passive while the boys are in active poses. If you look at the merch itself, the poses are similar. The girls are in passive positions. They are holding their hair, turned away from the viewer, standing still, etc. The boys are in more active poses. We see thousands of images like these everyday from images on our clothes to advertisements. There is not a single piece of merchandise for Merida where she is shooting her bow, riding Angus, etc. She is either standing still or sitting down. She is rather passive for a character who is praised for being so active and outgoing. When you click on the Brave page, the triplets are doing goofy things and making funny faces. Merida? She is leaning against an arrow. I’ll continue using Jake the Pirate. He is swinging his sword, moving around, etc. on all of his merchandise. He is active while Merida is standing still. This all reinforces traditional gender roles. We may not think of it but its reinforcing the notion that girls should be passive and boys will be active. Is that true for all girls and boys? Of course not. There are many very active girls and many passive boys. As you see in Disney’s new video when you go to the Disney store about the girl archer. Disney shows how Merida being involved in archery herself, helped people realize girls can also be involved in the sport. Does that break down traditional gender roles? Not when the only thing connected to Merida’s archery is her bow and arrow which is usually sold out. Otherwise, you only see Merida holding her bow behind her back while she is faced away from you. If she was a man? She’d be shooting that arrow into a target or something.

Through Disney’s merchandise they are enforcing the gender norms that parents, teachers, friends, family, etc. already enforce. Disney gives girls a very narrow definition of girlhood that only involves glitter, pretty dresses, and passivity. You do not see Mulan in her armor on her merchandise. She is only in her machmakers dress. You don’t see Merida using her bow and arrow. She is only holding them. You don’t see Belle reading or Ariel exploring. You only see them standing still in pretty dresses. Whereas you will see the boys being active on their merchandise. Disney makes millions of dollars off their merchandise. They specifically market their merchandise at boys or girls. You will see girl toys in the boys sections but you will be hard pressed to find boy toys in the girls sections. That is enforcing the notion that girls can play with boy things but boys cannot play with girl things.

I wrote all of this after only spending a few minutes on the Disney Stores website. You don’t have to browse every single section of the Dinsey Stores website to see how they create gender roles and enforce them. Hell, the images do that for you.

115 notes

Mulan ≠ Anti-femininity

lipsredasroses:

image

I’m going to write a full review of Mulan later but I want to address the notion that Mulan is somehow anti-femininity. I’ve seen this argument crop up in feminist circles and anytime anyone addresses good role models. Mulan usually comes up because she is “anti-feminine” and a “tomboy.” After rewatching the movie I don’t get it.

The first argument is usually “she hated her matchmakers dress.” She wears the dress throughout the first part of the movie. The dress itself honestly does not bother her. It’s the whole idea of being a “respectable bride” that Mulan is against because she knows she wouldn’t be good at it. Once the soldiers finds out she is a woman and she is alone she confesses she wanted to join the army not so much to save her father but to prove she could do something right. In the beginning of the movie you see Mulan fail at every task to become a “respectable bride.” She is late to get ready to meet the matchmaker. She is last in line to line up to meet the matchmaker. She speaks out of turn. She ruins the tea and sets the matchmakers butt on fire. She failed at everything involving marriage. She also seems rather indifferent to the whole idea. She went through with the matchmaker to bring honor to her family not because she wanted it. The whole scene doesn’t even show Mulan is a tomboy or anti-femininity. All it shows is Mulan is not comfortable with the matchmaker and marriage.

The next argument is that Mulan is a soldier. Mulan runs away to join the army and is clearly very masculine because she does that. Except not really. By the end of the training she is stronger than the rest of the men.  She ends up being a very good soldier because she is quick on her feet and can plan ahead under pressure (unlike Shang). Like with the matchmaker, she doesn’t fit in with the other soldiers. She finds them gross and disgusting. She makes those comments throughout her time as a soldier. During the song “A Girl Worth Fighting For” she is utterly baffled by the women the guys find desirable. She is saddened when they turn her down when she says she wants a girl who has a brain and always speaks her mind. She doesn’t truly shine as a soldier until the end of the movie when she is saving China as a woman.

Which brings me to my main point/argument for why I don’t believe Mulan is anti-femininity or a tomboy. She is most comfortable when she finds herself at the end of the movie. She saves China as a woman. She is not pretending to be a man anymore but herself. She dresses up Ling,  Chein-Po, and Yao as women to save the Emperor. She defeats Shan-Yu with a fan. She uses the fan to grab his sword and keep him on the roof. She defines femininity for herself. She defines who she is and brings honor to her family, which is what she wanted throughout the movie, by being herself. She learned she didn’t have to be anyone but herself to make herself and her family proud.

She is not anti-femininity because she is more comfortable in armor. That is just not true. She is as comfortable in her matchmaking dress as she is in armor. What she wears does not define her. I think its ridiculous that Disney markets her in her matchmaking dress because she wore that dress when she was least comfortable with herself. She should be in the final dress of the movie, like all the other princesses, because that is the dress she wore when she saved China and was most comfortable with herself. I think it would be cool if she was marketed more as Ping but I would still be much happier if she was wearing the final dress in the movie.

With all that being said, I’ll write up a full review of the movie sometime this week. It’s one of my favorites.