Feminist Media

Taking Back the Media

Posts tagged media

235 notes

NBC and Law & Order:SVU: We request that you re-consider casting convicted rapist, Mike Tyson on Law & Order:SVU

shooting4ownhand:

shooting4ownhand:

Please sign this petition, even if you don’t watch the show. While there are many feminist debates about this show, one thing we can all agree on is a convicted rapist should NOT be on this show. This is a slap in the face of all survivors of sexual assault/rape and the survivors who are fans of the show. This is absolutely disgusting.

Seriously tumblr? You will get all the required signatures needed on pointless shit like getting a puppy a purple collar within minutes but not for something like this?!?

(Source: lipsredasroses, via lipsredasroses)

235 notes

NBC and Law & Order:SVU: We request that you re-consider casting convicted rapist, Mike Tyson on Law & Order:SVU

shooting4ownhand:

Please sign this petition, even if you don’t watch the show. While there are many feminist debates about this show, one thing we can all agree on is a convicted rapist should NOT be on this show. This is a slap in the face of all survivors of sexual assault/rape and the survivors who are fans of the show. This is absolutely disgusting.

(Source: lipsredasroses)

29 notes

Does It Matter If the Heroine of 'Brave' Is Gay?

At its core, Brave preaches acceptance. It’s about the compassion it takes to, as Merida and Elinor put it, “break tradition,” to change both society’s rules and the prejudices within ones’ own mind. It’s about the terrible things that can result when people—especially family members—don’t try to understand one another. And it’s about having the bravery to embrace one’s own identity. Those themes resonate with struggles far and wide, but perhaps most strongly, these days, with those of LGBT people. The film doesn’t need to tell us whether Merida is gay. It just needed to make us ask.

(Source: lipsredasroses)

10,998 notes

I’m so tired of this “No Male Role-models in Brave” shit.

historicalslut:

quixoticandabsurd:

So tired of it.

Because seriously, nobody batted an eye when I was little and walked out of the theater after seeing Toy Story proclaiming, “Woody is so cool! I want to be just like him!”

Nobody cared that I was a little girl looking up to a male character. Not a single person would have been upset if I wanted a Sully toy, or if I admired Simba more than Nala. No parents said to their daughters, “No, I’m not taking you to see Up! because there’s no females for you to look up to!”

Because as long as it was men being awesome, parents decided that our kids could see through typical gender stereotypes. They decided, “my kid can learn something from this film even though she is a girl and that character is a boy.”

But as soon as the roles are reversed everyone is up in arms about it. Well that’s nonsense. Because if you’re really not sexist, you’ll realize that it’s just as fine for your daughter to like Finding Nemo as it is for your son to like Brave.

So get off your sexist pedestal, stop complaining, and take your son to see Brave. And hope to all that is holy that he learns something from it…like how to fight against the current patriarchal system. Because he sure as hell isn’t going to learn that from you.

emphasis mine.

(via lipsredasroses)

120 notes

"Brave"

historicalslut:

So after reading Richard Lawson’s piece on Brave, it was clear to me he missed the point of Brave. Which doesn’t really surprise me. I only have one male friend who has seen Brave and he liked it. He doesn’t get why I adore this movie and love it to pieces. He doesn’t really get why this movie is so powerful. Many of my female friends have seen it and they all have similar reactions to it. They’ve all liked it or loved it but every single woman has told me they connected to Merida and Elinor’s relationship. Every single one told me they could relate to the mother/daughter relationship in the movie. One of the most powerful scenes in the movie to me was when Elinor destroyed Merida’s bow and she realized what she did was wrong. When she was overcome by the realization that she destroyed her daughters favorite thing. I wont lie, I wish my mom had a realization like that when I was younger and she made me stop riding horses (taking away your daughters only form of happiness while she was depressed/suicidal was a stupid parenting move,  but I digress). We all could connect to the struggle Merida had with her mom in the beginning of the movie and some of us could relate to when they made up and became closer. It is something every woman walking into that theater could relate to on some level and that is powerful. A father/son relationship is common in movies. An accurate depiction of a mother/daughter relationship is not. Hell, a good mother/daughter relationship in the media is hard to find. I was talking to my friend about this and the only show that centered around a mother/daughter relationship that was accurate was Gilmore Girls. There are some good mother/daughter relationships in the media (Mama Rizzoli and Jane for example) but they aren’t central to the plot of the show/movie.

I’ve yet to see someone who has seen the movie who doesn’t love Elinor and Merida. They may like one more than the other but they are both strong women. Elinor truly is the ruler of her kingdom. While Fergus is the king, he doesn’t rule the kingdom. He follows Elinors lead and lets her shine. She truly is the most powerful person in the kingdom and you don’t see Fergus acting like an ass about it. He realizes she is a better ruler and supports his wife. He gives advice when he can but ruling is just not his thing. It’s not something he truly cares about and supports his wife anyway he can. That is a powerful imagine of a working mother (she is running her kingdom after all) and a functional couple. In most Disney movies one or both of the parents are dead. You do not see a couple who are truly supportive of each other in most Disney movies (The Incredibles being one of the few exceptions, which is also a Pixar film). This movie gives women two great female role models, Merida and Elinor. Girls get to see a queen who is highly respected and loved by her people. They get to see her rule her land and be in a powerful position. How many strong powerful queens do you see in Disney movies? None. The Queens are either silent or villains. They also have Merida, who is head strong, independent, and believes in herself. They get a role model who is as confident as her mother and really will fight for what she believes in. She truly is the Princess I wish I had growing up. Not that I don’t love Belle, Ariel, Jasmine, and the other princesses I grew up with but their stories still revolve around the men in their lives not the women. It was nice and refreshing to see a Princess movie just about the women with the men as the background characters. That is truly revolutionary.

While these characters are good role models for girls, they are good role models for boys as well. I am so sick of seeing people think these two women can only be role models for girls. This movie does show kids that girls are just as strong and powerful as boys. Girls can change their fate like boys. Girls can be rulers of their kingdom and not just trophy wives. This movie smashes gender stereotypes (at least with the DunBrough clan). Fergus is a fun loving King who supports his wife. Fergus supports and loves his family. While Elinor is clearly the “head” of the family, Fergus and her support each other and their kids. They love and respect each other. While Fergus is a loveable guy, he isn’t the main character in the movie. He is a background character. The true role models in the movie are Merida and Elinor. They are the ones who are role models for everyone. They are the ones who are smashing gender stereotypes and showing both boys and girls that girls can do and be anything they want. It is showing boys and girls that there really is no “girl” or “boy” things. Elinor does both “men’s things” like running the kingdom and horseback riding (why is this considered a boy thing? I don’t get it but I digress) as well as “girl things” like making her tapestry. Merida in the end helps her mother with her new tapestry of the two of them and loves things like archery and horseback riding. These women are three dimensional characters who like a whole range of things. Neither of them hate “girl things” and devalue them. Merida learns to value what her mother teaches her in the end. These women are role models for both men and women. Fergus is a good character that both boys and girls can love. The triplets are funny and boys and girls can love them. These characters are not just for one gender.

I’m sure somewhere in this rant to tell Lawson to go fuck himself there was a point. My point is, since I probably didn’t make it clear, this movie is revolutionary, especially for Disney. Yes there are problems like the fact there is no POC in the entire movie. This is a movie women do relate to and that is a powerful thing. It is a movie that everyone can love. Merida and Elinor are role models for everyone. It’s nice seeing two powerful women being the lead in a movie and they are not battling it out over something. It shows kids that they can change their fate and they don’t have to do what they don’t want to. The fact it is a girl showing kids that is revolutionary considering girls are still denied agency in most films and society at large.

(Source: lipsredasroses)

121 notes

newwavefeminism:

Marvel’s Sexy Pajamas Turn Real Women Into Fantasies

Marvel has taken Jessica Rabbit’s “I’m not bad. I’m just drawn that way.” quote and applied it to flesh and blood humans. In a remarkably comic book solution to making sexy pajamas, Marvel, via Spencer’s, are drawing sexy female bodies on their pajamas. I can only imagine how this conversation went. Read the Marvel Exec character in the voice of J. Johah Jameson.
Marvel Assistant: Spencer’s is telling us our sexy superheroine pajamas line isn’t sexy enough.
Marvel Exec: What are you talking about? We’ve got the sexiest superheroines in the business!
Marvel Assistant: Apparently our female characters bodies are unrealistic when compared to most women.
Marvel Exec: Well, why don’t we just draw them differently!
Marvel Assistant: Yes sir, I’ll tell the artists to draw our female characters with bigger waists and smaller boobs.
Marvel Exec: No, you numbskull! We’ll just draw women on the pajamas with smaller waists and bigger boobs.
High fives and bonuses for everyone! Keep clicking for a closer look at these genius pajamas.

More examples of the problematic male gaze/female form aesthetic in comic art, which was originally highlighted in this post that criticized an artist’s rendering of Spider Man’s Mary Jane. Granted these aren’t actual comic drawings and are likely gag gifts per the norm for merchandise at Spencer’s, it’s still interesting to see how the female form is represented in a comic art-related platform. Am I making any sense?
newwavefeminism submission from softjunebreeze
Wow. Thanks! Great post =)

newwavefeminism:

Marvel’s Sexy Pajamas Turn Real Women Into Fantasies

Marvel has taken Jessica Rabbit’s “I’m not bad. I’m just drawn that way.” quote and applied it to flesh and blood humans. In a remarkably comic book solution to making sexy pajamas, Marvel, via Spencer’s, are drawing sexy female bodies on their pajamas. I can only imagine how this conversation went. Read the Marvel Exec character in the voice of J. Johah Jameson.

Marvel Assistant: Spencer’s is telling us our sexy superheroine pajamas line isn’t sexy enough.

Marvel Exec: What are you talking about? We’ve got the sexiest superheroines in the business!

Marvel Assistant: Apparently our female characters bodies are unrealistic when compared to most women.

Marvel Exec: Well, why don’t we just draw them differently!

Marvel Assistant: Yes sir, I’ll tell the artists to draw our female characters with bigger waists and smaller boobs.

Marvel Exec: No, you numbskull! We’ll just draw women on the pajamas with smaller waists and bigger boobs.

High fives and bonuses for everyone! Keep clicking for a closer look at these genius pajamas.

More examples of the problematic male gaze/female form aesthetic in comic art, which was originally highlighted in this post that criticized an artist’s rendering of Spider Man’s Mary Jane. Granted these aren’t actual comic drawings and are likely gag gifts per the norm for merchandise at Spencer’s, it’s still interesting to see how the female form is represented in a comic art-related platform. Am I making any sense?

newwavefeminism submission from softjunebreeze

Wow. Thanks! Great post =)

(via koryminxxx)

28 notes

Amanda Knox and the Stigma of the Sexist Media.

silentpunk:

Been seeing a lot of sexist shit about this acquitted woman Amanda Knox. As an attractive, young and female murder suspect she has been getting a lot of attention in the press apparently (I’m so out of touch).

It seems in Facebook and Twitter comments, like in many areas of society, commentators can openly join in with the sexual objectification of this woman while simultaneously slut-shaming and victim-blaming her for it. Whether this woman committed murder or not (the courts have now cleared her) she has been marked and demonised as sexual object and ‘media whore’ before she has even had a chance to do anything deemed ‘slutty’ or ‘money grabbing’.

A quick mental gender reverse and … yes I can confirm that a male former suspect would never be treated like this. In fact I don’t need to imagine; her ex-boyfriend who was convicted of the same crime, it has been pointed out, got far less coverage than she did and I would be quick to remind any sexists reading that this is the media’s doing, not hers.

What should be obvious is that the murder conviction is not a necessary element in the unwarranted (okay, it’s always unwarranted) slut-shaming, hounding and sexist demonisation of a woman targeted by the media. Just look at any of those odious annually compiled lists of ‘most annoying people’, overwhelmingly populated by women whose only crime appears to be living under a media microscope (rather than, say, murder). Yes many are sick of hearing about these women, but can we not have a point of self-awareness where we realise that venom should not be channeled into those sexist bon mots that just roll off the tongue (a little too easily) but into a critique of the industry and culture that funds those upskirt paparazzi shots (what a slut!), illegally placed bathroom cameras (OMG she’s on drugs? FOR SHAME!) and relentless tabloid slander…?

Bring in the fascination our sexist society has with female murderers and this woman is going to be marked for life and in most people’s eyes she’ll deserve every bit of shit slung her way. Even when cleared by the courts, the idea of a female killer holds a lot of interest and she will never truly be redeemed.


  Having read somewhere that, in cases of violent crime, women often serve harsher sentences and are less likely to be granted parole than their male counterparts I turned to Google. Many of the top results are yahoo answers (or similar) discussions asking ‘why are women given lighter sentences than men?’, followed by a stream of utter ignorance taking the original question as fact revealing it was just another exercise in sexism rather than a fact-finding mission.

This article  by Rachel Thwaites from ‘The F Word’ has said it all before, so do check it out.

Women are not expected to commit violent crimes and this is because of the myth of some inherent ‘caring’ nature (as opposed to a man’s natural aggressive nature). Women are far less likely to commit violent crimes than men. This means that women on average commit less serious crimes, so they obviously, on average, serve shorter sentences as well as making up a smaller percentage of the prison population! But when they do commit these more serious crimes, why are the tabloid press so quick to invoke the outdated idea of ‘evil’ or ‘witchcraft’? How can it be more ‘evil’ for a woman to commit the same crime as a man? Why are they more harshly judged?

If Amanda Knox was a man, at the centre of this highly-publicised murder-mystery, would we be blaming and shaming him for a suspected million dollar book-deal? I reckon he’d be the venerated hero and we’d be eagerly awaiting his stoic or tearful exclusive on our favourite chat show. So shut up.

 http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/oct/03/amanda-knox-raffaele-sollecito-cleared-murder

(via boomvagynamite)

2,797 notes

Femmephobia can also be seen in marketing. We have diet soda, and we have diet soda FOR MEN; we have loofahs, and we have loofahs FOR MEN; we have canned soup, and we have canned soup FOR MEN. Men cannot be expected to consume feminine things like body care items or diet food or soup in cans (!?) unless it is specifically marked out as Not Girly, and therefore Not Bad. With a few obnoxious exceptions, such as tools for girls (they’re pink) or video games for girls (they’re pink and have Barbie), women who like traditionally masculine hobbies get to have the same fishing poles, golf clubs and bad Trekkie novels as the boys– because, since masculinity is valued, it doesn’t matter if a woman tries to become masculine.

On Femmephobia | No, Seriously, What About Teh Menz? (via zaftiggles)

Can I just say that I would LOVE it if I could walk into Home Depot and find that instead of selling shoddily made, pink-ified, “women’s” tools, they just sold “light” versions of tools for people with less body strength and/or smaller hands? And it’s not just women that it would benefit (not to mention the cissexism involved in labelling them ‘women’s’ tools), but anyone who’s not some large, muscular, able-bodied, adult cismale.

And, btw, us girls wrote our own bad Trekkie novels. How do you think modern fanfiction got its start? ;-)

OK, reblogging this to add more. Men’s products are almost always less expensive and better quality than women’s products.

Quality-wise, the entire video game industry is almost entirely focused around men (the Legend of Zelda franchise is one of the few that seems to be fairly unisex, both in terms of characters and players) except for a few “Pink! Cute animals! Clothes!” video games aimed at girls. And, of course, the video games aimed at girls never have anywhere near the quality of story, art, or gameplay that all the other video games do - the creators didn’t try to make a good video game that girls would enjoy playing (say, featuring female characters) but rather tried to fit stereotypical “girl” things into a video game format, so of course they were all failures from a quality standpoint, so of course it’s seen as a “niche” market that doesn’t really bring in money but is just an obligatory, half-hearted attempt not to alienate 50% of their potential customer base. 

Price-wise, you can see this in the personal care aisle. Men’s razors always seem to be cheaper than the women’s ones, men’s deodorant is usually cheaper, women’s shaving cream is often more expensive than men’s despite the fact that we’re expected to shave 10x as much surface, and so on.

(via aim2misbehave)

(via aim2misbehave)